Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Act Will Save Lives if Congress Passes It

Joy Covey and her son Tyler

Joy Covey and her son Tyler

Joy Covey, 50, who helped catapult Amazon.com from a small company to a global powerhouse and the mother to her son Tyler, was bicycling near her home of Woodside California. Michael Valenzuela, 18, a player and coach for his high school soccer team in Palmdale,was bicycling to play soccer. Both were killed earlier this year in collisions with vehicles. Every year we lose more than 100 Californians to these tragedies, and statistics show it’s not getting better.

Michael Valenzuela

Michael Valenzuela

Even though almost one-in-five California households does not have a car, and almost one-in-four crash victims are outside of a car, 99% of federal safety nationwide money goes to protect people in cars. To address this disparity, a bipartisan coalition of House lawmakers introduced the Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Act which will require the U.S. Department of Transportation to set specific safety targets for all roadway users — not just motorists, but pedestrians and bicyclists, too.  It gives US DOT the flexibility to determine the best method to meet these safety measures.

It’s a small change with broad support, but a change we cannot afford to lose. So join this effort and tell your lawmakers to vote for this straightforward, bi-partisan bill.

People like Joy and Michael, stars in their communities, should not be in the blindspot of our transportation system.

The priorities of our state's transportation spending do not match the need of its people.

The priorities of our state’s transportation spending do not match the need of its people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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